Apologetics – Semester Exam Questions

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Chapter 1

1,2,3,4,5,7,12,13,14,19,21,23

Ravi – Why Don’t I Feel My Faith?

Neitzsche

Nihilism

3,5,8

First concept of language

14

[part two]

1,2,10

Chapter 2

2,3,4,5,8,9,10,13,15

“An Ancient Message”

4,10,15,19

[part two]

4,5,6,8,9,10,12,28

Chapter 3

2,3,5,7,8,10,15,16

“Jesus As They Saw Him”

6,7,10,11

[part two]

1,4,5,6

[part three]

8

[part four]

1,5

Chapter 4

2,3,4,5,7,8,9,12

“Is Christianity Beautiful?”

4,8,9,15,19,25,31,33,34

Chapter 5

4,6,9,13,14,15,23,24,25,26

“The Testimony of Science”

1,3,7,21,24

[part two]

3,9,12,13,17

Chapter 6

1,2,3,7,10,11,13,15,16,20,26

“Is Faith Delusional?”

nothing part one

[part two]

1,2

“Semi-transcendence”

“Delusions”

[part three]

1,4

[part four]

4,5,6,11,12

[part five]

5

Chapter 7

1,2,7,9,11,15,17,18,22,23,26

“Though the Fig Tree Does Not Bud”

Nietzsche

Aristotle

11,13,14

[part two]

2,10,11,14,15

Chapter 8

3,4,5,10,16,17,18,20,23

“What is Worthwhile Under the Sun?”

5,6,10

[part two]

5

[part three]

1

[part four]

Application Two

Application Three

4

G.K. Chesterton – Miracles

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“My belief that miracles have happened in human history is not a mystical belief at all; I believe in them upon human evidences as I do in the discovery of America. Upon this point there is a simple logical fact that only requires to be stated and cleared up. Somehow or other an extraordinary idea has arisen that the disbelievers in miracles consider them coldly and fairly, while believers in miracles accept them only in connection with some dogma. The fact is quite the other way. The believers in miracles accept them (rightly or wrongly) because they have evidence for them. The disbelievers in miracles deny them (rightly or wrongly) because they have a doctrine against them.”

… Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), Orthodoxy, London, New York: John Lane Company, 1909, p. 278-279

Capon – It was very good

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“The world exists, not for what it means but for what it is. The purpose of mushrooms is to be mushrooms, wine is in order to wine: Things are precious before they are contributory. It is a false piety that walks through creation looking only for lessons which can be applied somewhere else. To be sure, God remains the greatest good; but, for all that, the world is still good in itself. Indeed, since He does not need it, its whole reason for being must lie in its own goodness; He has no use for it, only delight.”

… Robert Farrar Capon (1925-2013), The Supper of the Lamb, New York: Doubleday, 1969, p. 86

Swinburne – Suffering in the world

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“If God made a world without suffering, it would be a world in which humans had little responsibility for each other and for other creatures. Seeing that that alternative is not obviously better than the present world led me to see something about goodness—that there is more to it than tingles of pleasure—and about God—that his goodness is shown in the freedom and responsibility he gives to his creatures.”

… Richard G. Swinburne (b. 1934), Philosophers Who Believe, Kelly James Clark, Illinois: Inter-Varsity Press, 1993, p. 200

Bonhoeffer – The bearer of the Word

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“The Christian needs another Christian who speaks God’s Word to him. He needs him again and again when he becomes uncertain and discouraged, for by himself he cannot help himself without belying the truth. He needs his brother as a bearer and proclaimer of the divine word of salvation. He needs his brother solely because of Jesus Christ. The Christ in his own heart is weaker than the Christ in the word of his brother; his own heart is uncertain, his brother’s is sure.”

… Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945), Life Together [1954], tr. Daniel W. Bloesch & James H. Burtness, Fortress Press, 2004, p. 23

Dallas Willard – A conversational relationship with God

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“Our union with God—his presence with us, in which our aloneness is banished and the meaning and full purpose of human existence is realized—consists chiefly in a conversational relationship with God while we are each consistently and deeply engaged as his friend and colaborer in the affairs of the kingdom of the heavens.”

… Dallas Willard (1935-2013), Hearing God, Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 1999, p. 56